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Penelope Brooks Callaway Athon
Christmas Meditation
First Signs
Life in the Sixties
Stuck
What Irritates Me
Trish Kleine Borgman
Number, Please (2013 Selection)
Melanie Dees Campbell
Looking at it (2010 Selection)
Midnight to Dawn (excerpt)
Judy Frerking
UDC Electrifies Old Glory (excerpt)
Andrea Hatfield
Polio: The Dread Disease (2011 Selection)
Recollections/C.G. Page ...
  The Marshall Democrat-News, 4/9/2008
Harry M. Porter from the 376th Heavy Bombardment Group
Jacob Hatfield
Writer -- Past, Present and Future
The Plaque: (2009 Selection)
Eveleth Hill
A Day in Marshall Remembered (excerpt)
Ellen Holmes Jackson
You Took The Time
Jean H. Klein-Horman
My Favorite Season
E. Hamilton Lee
Flying West (excerpt)
Susan Long
Chemo
Looking Good
Home To Marshall (2007 Selection)
The Sword
Reverend Vernon Maxted
Restoration of the Church (excerpt)
Dorothy Peterman
A Lighted Window
Authorene Wilson Phillips
Arrow Rock: the Story of a Missouri Village
Dad's Highchair
Edgar Phillips
Cheap Narrow Row Soybean Planter, Farm Show, vol. 32, no. 2, page 33 (Farm Show)
Times Were Changing for Farm Families in Mid-Missouri (2012 Selection)
Lois Pontius
Hazel
Carol Mallman Raynor
Water Carried Up Hill: A Sense of Place and Past (excerpt)
Graydon Edward Richards, PhD
The Blue Swallow Still Flies
Cows, Classes & Co-Eds; My Two Years at Potomac State
First United Methodist Church, Marshall, Missouri
Letters
Carole Kays Schaefer
Jupiter's Caprice
Parallel Worlds
November Sunlight
Katie Sharon
Obey Your Daddy
Irene Thomas Sims
Depression at Our House
Good handwriting lands job, ...
Virginia Sprigg
The Marine Corps Saved His Life (excerpt)
Recollections/Mike Henderson ...
The Marshall Democrat-News, 5/8/2013
Uncle George Hayob's Mary Lou Theaters (2014 Selection)
Sidney West Sullivan
Live or Die Decade
Sez George
Peggy Wickizer
Flea Market Find
Naomi Wilford (Campbell)
I've Loved You In Blue
Journey With God
My Dad and Me
What's Morning Light?
UNCLE GEORGE HAYOB'S MARY LOU THEATERS (excerpted)
By Virginia Sprigg
Movies were becoming very enterprising in the early 1900s. Thus Uncle George decided to open a movie theater. His wife, Mary, had a niece named Mary Lou. Mary Lou was the daughter of Lena and Henry Bertman. Henry Bertman was in the grocery business at the time Uncle George's theater on North Street, the Mary Lou, opened. To honor the family he named the theater after his wife's niece.
Reprinted from Notes and Notables of Saline County © 2014
 
NUMBER, PLEASE (excerpted)
By Trish Kleine Borgman
The 1950s (whether early or late) -- my thoughts go immediately to Rosemary Gibbons, my dear childhood friend and our daily walks home from school. Living in Slater then was idyllic for two young girls in grade school. Of course, the environment looks quite different through a child's eyes than an adult's, but I recall the impressive maple tree-lined streets and giant two-story houses of our trek, all of which gave a special home-like secure feeling to little friends sharing their day's activities and future dreams. It seemed we could never get enough conversation in, and as we parted, each having a block or two left to our respective homes, the familiar announcement rang out. "Call me when you get home!"
Reprinted from The Late '50s, Marshall and Elsewhere © 2013
 
TIMES WERE CHANGING FOR FAMILIES IN MID-MISSOURI (excerpted)
By Edgar Phillips
Grain crops were corn, wheat, oats, and barley; soybeans, a major grain crop today, was not widely grown then. In 1950 Father retired his one team of horses and did most of his field work with a 1938 WC Allis Chalmers, which had no lights or power steering, and was hand cranked. In the spring of 1950 he bought a new WD Allis Chalmers. He put a short tongue in the two row planter and five foot mower and bought Woods Bros. one row pull type corn picker and stopped picking corn by hand. We shoveled all grain.
Reprinted from The Early Fifties, Marshall and Elsewhere © 2012
 
POLIO: THE DREAD DISEASE (excerpted)
By Andrea Hatfield
In the 1940s Poliomyelitis became a worldwide epidemic -- a disease greatly feared by parents because it most often afflicted young children, causing symptoms ranging from minor aches and pains to muscle paralysis and even death. Survivors of polio were often crippled for life. In 1949, my grandparents' fears were realized when their eight year old son (my father) was diagnosed with polio.
Reprinted from The Forties © 2011
 
LOOKING AT IT
By Melanie Dees Campbell
Feeling Lower Than Low,
Banknotes Called In,
Farm Foreclosed.
No Work, No Hope,
Movin' Home,
Nothing, No How,
Round The Table,
Family Sharing Stew,
Hopeful Hearts,
Together Making Do,
For A Better Tomorrow.
Reprinted from The Great Depression BitterSweet Days 1929-1939 © 2010
 
THE PLAQUE: (excerpted)
By Jacob Hatfield
It was a cool day. Crisp, and gray. A light breeze whispering from the west.

Dull green February grass sparsely covered the hilltop. I stood. Staring. Glaring. A weathered plaque in front of me.

The Plaque was faded, like the day. But it was vibrant. It told of a battle. A raid. A victory for one. And a loss for another.

An era of turmoil. Brother against brother. That was the mantra. That was the tale.

I looked. I saw. Two battle formations described on the Plaque. One blue. One gray. A Union. And a Confederacy.
Reprinted from Saline Silhouettes © 2009
 
OBEY YOUR DADDY (excerpted)
By Katie Sharon
I had recently retired from many years of teaching. During that time, I had seen and read about so many children in home situations that I knew should be different. Then I noticed a feature article in the Marshall Democrat News about CASA, Court Appointed Special Advocates, for children. Intrigued, I made inquiries and signed up for the training. So much information, so little time!
Reprinted from More Marshall MOments © 2008
 
HOME TO MARSHALL (excerpted)
By Susan Long
Our Voyager van sailed along the highways from Iowa where we'd participated in the memorial service for Jim's mother. She'd been almost 98 when she died, two months ago in August, just a few weeks after her extended family had gathered for a reunion. That reunion was the last time many of us saw Mother. It seemed like the end of an era.
Reprinted from Marshall MOments © 2007
 
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